Posts Tagged ‘hague convention apostille’

What is the Hague Convention?

Posted in Agreement Apostille, Apostillar, Apostille, Apostilled, Articles of Incorporation, Authentication, Birth Certificate, California, California Apostille, Hague Convention

The Hague Convention Abolishing the Requirement for Legalisation for Foreign Public Documents is one of the Hague Conference on Private International Law. It specifies the modalities through which a document issued in one of the signatory countries can be certified for legal purposes in all the other signatory states. Such a certification is called an apostille (a French word meaning certification). It is an international certification comparable to a notarisation in domestic law.

Hague Convention Apostille | Hague Convention Timeline

Posted in Agreement Apostille, Apostillar, Apostille, Apostilled, Authentication, California, Embassy Legalization, Hague Convention, United States

The Hague Convention(s) may refer to:

  • Hague Conventions (1899 and 1907), among the first formal statements of the laws of war and war crimes in international law
  • International Opium Convention, the first international drug control treaty, sometimes referred to as the Hague Convention of 1912
  • Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict (signed 14 May 1954)
  • Hague Conference on Private International Law, the preeminent organisation in the area of private international law from the early 1900s through the present day
    • Hague Convention Abolishing the Requirement of Legalisation for Foreign Public Documents, signed on October 5, 1961
    • Hague Convention on Foreign Judgments in Civil and Commercial Matters, signed in 1971
  • Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption, signed in 1993
  • What is an apostille?

    Posted in Apostille, Apostilled, Authentication, California, Embassy Legalization, Hague Convention, Power of Attorney, United States

    In 1961 many nations joined together to create a simplified method of “legalizing” documents for universal recognition in each other’s countries. Members of the conference, referred to as the Hague Convention Abolishing the Requirement for Legalization of Foreign Public Documents (33 U.S.T 883), adopted a document referred to as an Apostille that would be recognized by all member nations.


    Which Countries are not part of the Hague Convention?

    Posted in Apostille, Authentication, California, Cities, Hague Convention, Texas, United States

    The following countries require embassy legalization: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China – People’s Republic, Comoros, Congo – Dem. Rep., Congo – Rep. Brazzaville, Costa Rica, Cote d’Ivoire, Cuba, Djibouti, East Timor, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea – Bissau, Guinea – Republic, Guyana, Haiti, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Micronesia, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar/Burma, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Palestine, Paraguay, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia & Zimbabwe.